Tag: sexuality

Anetha, UFO95 & Orgaphine uncover slippery sexuality in Wet For It

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Casting their gaze over a menagerie of cybernetic, biomechanical and chimeric creatures, producers Anetha & UFO95 and CGI artist duo Orgaphine build a world in which fetish and phobia blur into one another.

‘Wet For It’ is the second collaborative track from producer, DJ and Mama Told Ya label head Anetha and rising talent UFO95, aka Killian Vaissade, a lethal, headlong charge through subterranean technoid textures, death drive synthesis and IDM inflected alien choruses, drawing influences from the duo’s shared love of hardcore techno, contemporary reggaeton and experimental sound design. “Killian is one of the most talented and proactive producers of his generation,” says Anetha. “I love his work and his universe.” Appearing on his second album, Use your difference to make the difference, ‘Wet For It’ is a thrilling glimpse of a new live project from the two artists, serving as an introduction to their collaborative sound. “With this new album I wanted to go further in my music making process, to not fix boundaries,” explains UFO95. Finding inspiration in ’90s IDM, specifically Richard D. James’s releases as Polygon Window, UFO95 worked to incorporate these sounds into Use your difference to make the difference. To match the dark ecstasy of the music, Anetha and UFO95 enlisted the talents of another creative duo, Orgaphine, the collaborative project of CGI artists Salika Kadita and Computer.kitty, to build a suitable world for ‘Wet For It’ to live inside of. The result is an ecosystem that surges between psychosexual manifestation and body horror mutation, in which fetishes and phobias blur into each other.

Wet For It

Following a twisted menagerie of cybernetic, biomechanical and chimeric creatures, Orgaphine explore their own sexual identities and bodies through various environments and avatars: shallow-breathing horse babies illuminated by floodlight, visions of an entropic, hermaphroditic fertility goddess, nests of umbilical cords and fallopian tubes. “The narrative is centered around Agena, who is the bird-like being with horse legs,” explain Orgaphine. “Agena moves around in this universe and connects with the horses through hoses and creates symbiotic, mutually benefitting relations. Agena is there to nurture the horses.” This central figure appears throughout the world of Wet For It, running figurative and literal lines through and from its different figures and scenes. Both nurturing mother and bound abomination, Agena’s erratic movement traces the strange momentum of Anetha and UFO95’s sound. “We tried to create a sexual space we can bring multiple sides of ourselves into and challenge a dominating stand on these topics; internalised ideas of our own bodies and sexuality,” Orgaphine explain. “Though we introduce sensitive topics, especially in the context of sexuality, like fear of umbilical cords, hyperventilation, dysphoria and the visual language itself, we wanted to tell a story where we can explore such things not for the sake of phobia, but to be recognized and included.”

Wet For It

“It does speak to some darkness, but we feel like, seen purely, it’s simply what’s going down in their world and they are having the best time,” they conclude. In the virtual worlds of Wet For It, sites of horror are reproduced as erotic zones, low-lit, Twin Peaks-esque nocturnal woodlands become a space for exploration, breath play reconfigured as a characteristic of the defenceless and viscera slick horse baby. A industrial cavern and rain-lashed canyon house strange bio-mechanical golems processing in solemn strides, dysphoric forms obscured by metallic face filters suspended from metallic exoskeletons, technologically mediated reproductions of their own likenesses constructed as ceaseless voyeuristic avatars, consigned to a trudging search. In the visual’s climactic moments, ivory white horses, born of fallopian nests swollen with eggs, are butterfly pinned to the concrete of a warehouse floor, the flailing dance of Agena channelled into a mutant ritual of care performed by an ersatz mother.

Wet For It
Wet For It

You can find Anetha, UFO95 and Orgaphine on Instagram. ‘Wet For It’, taken from Use your difference to make the difference, is out now.

Watch next: Rebecca Salvadori reflects on intimacy, community and liminality within London’s contemporary rave scene in The Sun Has No Shadow


https://www.factmag.com/2022/06/14/anetha-ufo95-orgaphine-wet-for-it/

Why Fans Are Questioning Mariah Brown’s Sexuality

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Audrey Kriss and Mariah Brown from Sister Wives are spotted at Utah’s gay pride event. Both have their shirts undone in an effort to show support.

Mariah Brown has been extremely supportive of her partner, Audrey Kriss, but Sister Wives viewers are now questioning whether Mariah is also going through a journey regarding her sexuality. Viewers have watched the two women step back from the limelight and move back to Utah. Even though Audrey and Mariah are not yet married, viewers are enjoying their updates on social media.

Mariah is Meri and Kody Brown’s only child. Like every other Brown sibling, Mariah has made it perfectly clear she does not want to live a polygamist lifestyle. Sister Wives fans loved seeing Mariah on the show as she added a lot to the series, especially when she challenged her family’s conservative ways as an adult. In 2017, Mariah came out as gay on a Sister Wives episode, which left her mother and father gobsmacked. While at college, Mariah met Audrey and announced shortly after that they planned to wed.

SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: Sister Wives: How Gwen & Mariah’s Coming Out Experiences Differ

Recently, Audrey posted a photo of themself and Mariah celebrating Salt Lake City’s pride festival. In the photo, fans noticed that Audrey and Mariah both had their shirts undone. Audrey shared with fans that “Open shirt at Pride this year was big time gender euphoria.” As Sister Wives viewers are aware, Audrey recently underwent top surgery to have their breasts removed. Mariah seemed to stand by her partner’s side and even had a few buttons undone herself, but many wondered if she, too, had undergone surgery.

Mariah only liked the photo and did not leave a comment for fans to dissect. Viewers couldn’t help but notice that Mariah’s look had changed a bit as she looks to be wearing more crop tops and biker shorts. At the end of May, Audrey took to social media to share some major news with their followers while showing off their chest. Sister Wives fans could clearly see the scars and noted how happy Audrey was. Audrey opened up to fans about how hard the past few years have been, but thankfully they had a good team supporting them, which has included Mariah.


While Mariah Brown has yet to acknowledge any of the fans’ comments, she seems to be happily standing by Audrey and their journey. Their wedding date has not yet been announced but Sister Wives fans already know they will not be filing their ceremony for the show. Mariah and Audrey have happily announced that after celebrating pride, they will be moving to Denver, Colorado, to be closer to their friends.

Next: Sister Wives: Inside Paedon And Mariah’s Longtime Feud

Source: Audrey Kriss/Instagram

Memphis Smith from 90 Day Fiancé

90 Day Fiancé: Memphis Reveals Weight Loss After Returning On Instagram


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https://screenrant.com/sister-wives-fans-are-questioning-mariah-browns-sexuality/

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Joe wants to donate blood. He can’t because of his sexuality

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Joe Staniszewski is sitting on his couch, dogs curled up next to him, with sadness in his eyes. Having worked as a registered nurse, he knows the importance of blood and the life-saving ability it has.
“I would love to give blood,” the 28-year-old from Perth says. But he knows he can’t.
Mr Staniszewski identifies as queer, and despite being in a monogamous relationship and practising safe sex, he’s not able to donate blood.

Australia is one of a declining number of countries across the world that places restrictions on men who want to donate blood if they have sex with other men, based on a perceived risk of HIV transmission.

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Restrictions were introduced in the 1980s when HIV/AIDS transmission was at its highest, and today the Australian Red Cross’ Lifeblood organisation still classifies “oral or anal sex with another man, even ‘safer sex’ using a condom” in the last three months as “at risk sexual activity”.
That’s despite HIV rates declining over the past decade.
“It frustrates me that a blanket approach has been put on,” says event coordinator for the Perth Gay Social Club Ian Odlum.
“People like myself who are very safe and take our sexual health very seriously would be willing to give blood, but because that blanket rule is there, I’m not able to.”
“A heterosexual man that doesn’t practise safe sex could be more of a risk than a same-sex man who practices safe sex. It’s discriminatory,” Mr Staniszewski says.
There are also to be able to donate blood in Australia.

Restrictions easing around the world

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic and natural disasters including the NSW and Queensland floods, demand for local blood donors remains high.
According to the Australian Red Cross, more than 1.6 million donations are needed every year, and while there are around 500,000 million active donors in the country, it says the need for blood is constant and new donors are always needed.
It’s the same story globally, and in recent years several countries have made the decision to repeal donor restrictions impacting men who have sex with men (MSMs).

“It’s been a long time coming. The current approach was discriminatory and wrong,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in April as Canada became the 31st country to remove limits or restrictions on the basis of sexual identity on those wanting to donate.

This year alone, France, Greece, Lithuania and Austria have also removed their restrictions.

Some countries including Germany and the Netherlands have made the decision to allow those who are in safe, monogamous relationships to freely donate blood without a deferral period.

How do the restrictions work?

Australia is one of 44 countries that impose restrictions on MSMs. Currently, if an MSM would like to donate blood they have to wait at least three months after having the sexual contact.

Often referred to as a ‘deferral period’, Australia is one of 21 nations worldwide that enforces it. These periods can range from three months in Australia’s case, up to five years.

World map showing the adult prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS

Source: Supplied / Charlie Mills/CIA World Factbook

The restrictions are enforced by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia which maintains they are in place to “maintain the safety and integrity of the Australian blood supply”.

The Australian Red Cross, too, maintains the rules are in place “to protect both the donor’s health and wellbeing as well as the recipient of the blood,” and denies it is discriminatory.
A spokesperson for the Federal Department of Health said: “The deferral policy has been independently assessed as not being discriminatory after consideration in several judicial and para-judicial forums – including the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal, the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission and the Tasmanian Anti-Discrimination Tribunal”.

Australia has made some progress in its restrictions after lowering the waiting period from 12 to three months in January 2021.

What are the rates of HIV in Australia?

HIV notifications reached a low of 633 in Australia in 2020, according to the Kirby Institute at the University of NSW. That’s a decline of 37 per cent since 2016. In gay and bisexual men, HIV diagnoses have declined by more than 44 per cent in the same period.

It’s estimated that 29,020 people, or 0.1 per cent of the Australian population, are living with HIV, and 91 per cent of those people are aware of their status and are receiving treatment.

World map illustrating restrictions on MSMs donating blood

Source: Supplied / Charlie Mills/Wikipedia

Paul Benson is a 44-year-old Perth resident and gay. He’s convinced that any ‘risk’ associated with gay sex is misconstrued.
“I would donate blood if I could. The fact that I’m on social media, I’m constantly bombarded with requests from the Red Cross, asking for blood donations. There’s not nearly enough people doing it.”

In today’s world, he says, the rules restricting him make little sense.

Paul Benson sitting in his home.

Paul Benson, 44, says blood donation restrictions are a “relic”.

Population versus individual risk

There is perhaps opportunity for change.
Australia currently uses a “population statistical risk approach”, which identifies risk factors across the population. But some countries such as the UK and Canada have decided to move towards an “individual risk assessment” which would identify donor eligibility based on the sexual activity of the individual, regardless of their sexual identity.
Terry Healy is the member for Southern River in the WA Legislative Assembly and a champion of blood donation in Australia. In 2016, then aged 34, he became the youngest ever Australian to donate blood 300 times and values the importance of voluntary donation.
“I understand Red Cross and the TGA had had the option to adopt an evidence-based approach to blood donation from gay and bisexual men for many years,” he says, “but have so far declined to take on that evidence-based approach”.

“Instead of screening donors for the gender of their sexual partner, we should screen them for the safety of their sexual activity,” he says.

“It does not matter whether a person is gay or straight. If a person engages in activity that puts them at high risk, they should not be allowed to donate. If a person is at low risk, they should be able to donate.”
In removing its restrictions, the Canadian government spent seven years and more than $5 million on research and scientific evidence that showed an individual risk approach not only would ensure the “safety of the blood supply”, but also put an end to “discriminatory practices”.
Many, including Mr Benson, are now calling for Australia to do the same.
“We’re told that these restrictions Australia has are for everybody’s safety. And yet, when these restrictions have been removed elsewhere, the sky hasn’t fallen in.”
In a statement provided to SBS News, a spokesperson from the Australian Red Cross Lifeblood program said: “We understand these rules exclude some groups from doing what others take for granted… We hear the hurt, frustration, and the anger and we understand the desire to help. We want that too”.
“We know that gay and bisexual men in declared monogamous relationships are a low risk, but as a group they are still at a higher risk of exposure than people in heterosexual relationships … This [three-month] wait time is also applied to heterosexual risks, including someone who has had sex with a new partner who has come from a country where HIV is prevalent. It is also applied to people who travel internationally to certain countries.
“We’re exploring whether it may be possible to further reduce the three-month waiting period for plasma donations.”
World Blood Donor Day is marked on 14 June.
Charlie Mills is a journalism student based in Perth. This article is an extract from his master’s degree project at Curtin University.
Would you like to share your story with SBS News? Email

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/joe-wants-to-donate-blood-he-cant-because-of-his-sexuality/tns7hi9w1

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I understand Rebel Wilson’s decision not to label her sexuality, but LGBT people need labels more than ever

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Journalists really aren’t supposed to make themselves the story. But – whoops! – Andrew Hornery from the Sydney Morning Herald has done just that, stealing focus from an international movie star.

He is accused of outing the comedy actor Rebel Wilson. Because after she posted on Instagram on Friday about her relationship with a woman, Hornery revealed he had approached her for comment the day before about the “story” – thereby, it appears, prompting her public disclosure.

The deranged weight of social media then landed on Hornery’s head. He’s now apologised, said he too is gay, and his editor insisted they will “learn” from this. But in all the messiness, something’s been missing in the response to Wilson’s statement: context.

She posted a photo with her beloved and said, “I thought I was searching for a Disney Prince… but maybe what I really needed all this time was a Disney Princess.” She didn’t use a label. Not lesbian. Not bi. Not queer. Not pansexual. Just love.

In many ways, that’s lovely, and very 2022. Who needs labels? We’ve moved on! People are people! But these exclamation marks, in case I need to spell it out, invoke denial. A mass denial, particularly of heterosexual liberals, who are so desperate not to think about homophobic and transphobic oppression that they constantly convince themselves that THINGS ARE FINE NOW. Meanwhile, hate crimes against LGBTQ people soared during the pandemic.

But it isn’t just a fantasy of heterosexuals. I love Rebel Wilson and love that she has expressed her love publicly. But she forms part of a growing number of (particularly young) people – public figures and private individuals – who are refusing to attach labels to themselves. This matters.

Harry Styles said in April: “I’ve been really open with it with my friends, but that’s my personal experience; it’s mine. The whole point of where we should be heading, which is toward accepting everybody and being more open, is that it doesn’t matter, and it’s about not having to label everything.”

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And the fabulous young actor Kit Connor, star of Heartstopper, said last month: “I just feel like I’m perfectly confident and comfortable in my sexuality, but I’m not too big on labels and things like that… And I don’t feel like I need to label myself, especially not publicly.”

I share his sentiment. And maybe Connor and Styles are, essentially, heterosexual; I don’t know. I’d prefer if we didn’t have to use labels and hate the idea that people feel enclosed by them. Do three letters (gay) give adequate information about the depth of one’s being? No. Labels place artificial parameters on human beings.

But imagine if all LGBTQ people refused to label ourselves. The laws against same-sex activities would remain. We’d be shouting, “Er, gay doesn’t fully describe the breadth of my romantic and sexual feelings, thank you!” through the bars of our prison, without a single human rights law to help us.

Harry Styles might wish to live in the future where all the battles have been won, but everyone else will one day feel the flash of hatred’s blade against the neck. Coming out, saying the word – the label – has been our single most potent shield. Without the self-labelling people in London’s first Pride march, 50 years ago next month, without those who fought back at the Stonewall Inn three years earlier, all uniting under labels and demanding liberation, we would be in jail or in the closet.

I know many lesbians and gay men in middle and old age, who are not a six on the Kinsey Scale (the Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale) yet pinned the label upon themselves out of a moral and social duty – less for themselves as for others. Have we forgotten solidarity, so intoxicated are we by the dream that we have already won?

No one wants to be reduced. Public figures whose talents have often made them so, do not want their artistry confined to a label. But this is the transition stage. One day, we hope, no one will need labels. But now? As fascist forces assemble across the world? We need labels quick, with as many people holding them aloft as possible, chanting as one, so governments see our size, and recognise our power.

Because in the end, real emancipation isn’t born of you or me or any individual. It’s about us.

https://inews.co.uk/opinion/i-understand-rebel-wilsons-decision-not-to-label-her-sexuality-but-lgbt-people-need-labels-more-than-ever-1684593

I Came Out to a New Friend About My Sexuality

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Source: © TINA NIZOVA | Shutterstock

I met this woman who lives in my building last week. She complimented me on being the “best dog mom,” because she always sees me walking Shelby, my rescue dog. We got to talking and the conversation flowed freely. We’re about the same age, but Melissa (not her real name) is divorced and retired from being a teacher. We exchanged numbers. That was at the beginning of this week.

Yesterday, I got a call from her. She’s going to Florida and could I water her plants for her? Not a big deal. I go over to her apartment so she can show me what to do and we sit on her terrace and start talking. She asked me if I was dating and I literally just blurted out I was asexual. She seemed to have no reaction or was hiding her reaction. It’s not something you hear every day. I didn’t go into more detail, nor did she ask, but she did ask if I was lonely.

I came to terms with my sexuality while in long-term therapy with my former psychiatrist, Dr. Lev. She was the first therapist with whom I felt comfortable talking openly about sex and, additionally, I felt that regardless of what I said, Dr. Lev wouldn’t judge me. I first became aware that asexuality existed when I read a 2015 New York Times Modern Love column written by a college student, titled “Asexual and Happy.” I was 54 when everything finally made sense: Why I didn’t know how to flirt, why I wasn’t particularly interested in dating, why I didn’t lose my virginity until I was 51, why I didn’t like sex. Realizing I’m asexual came as a revelation and as a relief. I found AVEN (The Asexual Visibility and Education Network) and reading the information on their website cemented for me that I’m in the right place:

“An asexual person does not experience sexual attraction – they are not drawn to people sexually and do not desire to act upon attraction to others in a sexual way. Unlike celibacy, which is a choice to abstain from sexual activity, asexuality is an intrinsic part of who we are, just like other sexual orientations.”

When Melissa asked if I was lonely, I answered that I had a lot of close friends, like my friends from two jobs ago in Queens with whom I get together for dinner once or twice a month. I have a friend from my entrepreneurial program in 2018 who lives in Bronxville and we talk often and will go for walks and get coffee. I told her my brother lives in Connecticut and he and I are extremely close. We talk and see each other often. And I’m working six days a week at my day job, and I have a small business I’m trying to get off the ground. And I have a burgeoning freelance writing career, So no, I’m not lonely.

Melissa asked me if I’m Jewish and I said I was, and if I’m affiliated with any temple. I laughed and said no, neither my brother nor I had had a bar or bat mitzvah. She said she had become involved with a temple when her kids turned Hebrew school age. That night, she continued, was her temple’s gala and she was planning on attending. She told me there were no single men there and that she is on a bunch of dating apps.

I nodded my head and said I hear that from a lot of my female clients: There are just no good men out there. I added that I don’t regret not being on that merry-go-round of going on one or two dates, then back to reading profiles. The subject changed to Melissa’s parents, and the reason for her trip to Florida. She is bringing them back to live in New York, her father into assisted living, and she needs to find an apartment for her mother.

I’m glad I made a connection with someone in the building. Time will tell if she considers asexuality “weird” or “freaky.” I hope she views it in the context in which it belongs: LGBTQA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer, Asexual, and Aromantic).

© Andrea Rosenhaft

Source: © Andrea Rosenhaft

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/both-sides-the-couch/202206/i-came-out-new-friend-about-my-sexuality

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Lukas Gage claps back at people making assumptions about his sexuality

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13 June 2022, 15:20

A troll criticised Lukas Gage for playing multiple LGBTQ+ characters after assuming that he was straight.

Lukas Gage has clapped back at a person who assumed he was straight and criticised him for playing LGBTQ+ characters.

Lukas Gage is quickly establishing himself as one of the most in demand actors on TV right now. From his role as Tyler in the first season of Euphoria to his recent ass-baring performance as Dillon in The White Lotus, fans can’t get enough of the star. Not to mention, Lukas has just landed a part as a series regular on You. He will appear as Adam in season 4 this year.

Lukas has also played several, notable gay and queer roles in series such as Love, Victor and Queer as Folk. Now, Lukas has called out trolls who’ve made assumptions about his sexuality and accused him of taking on roles that should go to LGBTQ+ actors.

READ MORE: Lukas Gage shares his mum’s reaction to explicit sex scene in The White Lotus

Lukas Gage claps back at people making assumptions about his sexuality
Lukas Gage claps back at people making assumptions about his sexuality.

Picture:
Rich Fury/Getty Images, HBO


Last week (Jun 9), someone took to Twitter to write: “If Hollywood can stop hiring non LGBTQIA+ actors like @lukasgage to play LGBTQIA+ characters, that would be great. He has played 4 so far. 1 was enough.” The person tagged Lukas in the tweet and it wasn’t long before Lukas noticed it himself. He then replied: “U don’t know my alphabet.”

In response, the person tweeted: “Then please, enlighten the whole world,” and Lukas simply replied: “No,” with a red heart emoji.

Fans were also quick to defend Lukas. One person tweeted: “Trying to force people out of the closet during pride month is not the move that you think it is.” Another added: “Actors do not owe that piece of personal information to anyone.”

While it is true that historically LGBTQ+ actors have often lost out on queer roles to straight actors, Lukas has never publicly labelled his sexuality. And, as his fans have said, he doesn’t owe that information to anyone.


https://www.popbuzz.com/tv-film/news/lukas-gage-gay-sexuality/

A scholar of religion, gender and sexuality explains

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The Catholic Church’s official line on abortion, and even on any artificial birth control, is well known: Don’t do it.

Surveys of how American Catholics live their lives, though, tell a different story.

The vast majority of Catholic women have used contraceptives, despite the church’s ban. Fifty-six percent of U.S. Catholics believe abortion should be legal in all or most circumstances, whether or not they believe they would ever seek one. One in four Americans who have had abortions are Catholic, according to the Guttmacher Institute, which advocates for reproductive health.

It’s a clear reminder of the complex relationship between any religious tradition’s teachings and how people actually live out their beliefs. With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that protects abortion rights nationwide, religious attitudes toward a woman’s right to end a pregnancy are in the spotlight. But even within one faith, there is no one religious position toward reproductive rights – let alone among different faiths.

Christianity and conscience

As a scholar of gender and religion, I research how religious traditions shape people’s understandings of contraception and abortion.

When it comes to official stances on abortion, religions’ positions are tied to different approaches to some key theological concepts. For instance, for several religions, a key issue in abortion rights is “ensoulment,” the moment at which the soul is believed to enter the body – that is, when a fetus becomes human.

The catch is that traditions place ensoulment at different moments and give it various degrees of importance. Catholic theologians place ensoulment at the moment of conception, which is why the official position of the Catholic Church is that abortion is never permitted. From the moment the sperm meets the egg, in Catholic theology, a human exists, and you cannot kill a human, regardless of how it came to exist. Nor can you choose between two human lives, which is why the church opposes aborting a fetus to save the life of the pregnant person.

As in any faith, not all Catholics feel compelled to follow the church teachings in all cases. And regardless of whether someone thinks they would ever seek an abortion, they may believe it should be a legal right. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. Catholics say abortion is morally wrong, but 68% still support Roe v. Wade, while only 14% believe that abortion should never be legal.

People opposed to abortion gather at the Washington Monument during the 2017 March for Life rally in Washington, D.C.
Tasos Katopodis/AFP via Getty Images

Some Catholics advocate for abortion access not despite but because of their dedication to Catholic teachings. The organization Catholics for Choice describes its work as rooted in Catholicism’s emphasis on “social justice, human dignity, and the primacy of conscience” – people making their own decisions out of deep moral conviction.

Other Christians also say faith shapes their support for reproductive rights. Protestant clergy, along with their Jewish colleagues, were instrumental in helping women to secure abortions before Roe, through a network called the Clergy Consultation Service. These pro-choice clergy were motivated by a range of concerns, including desperation that they saw among women in their congregations, and theological commitments to social justice. Today, the organization still exists as the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice.

There are myriad Protestant opinions on abortion. The most conservative equate it with murder, and therefore oppose any exemptions. The most liberal Protestant voices advocate for a broad platform of reproductive justice, calling on believers to “Trust Women.”

Who is a ‘person’?

Muslims scholars and clerics, too, have a range of positions on abortion. Some believe abortion is never permitted, and many allow it until ensoulment, which is often placed at 120 days’ gestation, just shy of 18 weeks. In general, many Muslim leaders permit abortion to save the life of the mother, since classical Islamic law sees legal personhood as beginning at birth – though while many Muslims may seek out their religious leaders for guidance about or assistance with abortion, many do not.

Jewish tradition has a great deal of debate about when ensoulment occurs: Various rabbinic texts place it at or even before conception, and many place it at birth, but ensoulment is not as key as the legal status of the fetus under Jewish law. Generally, it is not considered to be a person. For instance, the Talmud – the main source of Jewish law – refers to the fetus as part of the mother’s body. The biblical Book of Exodus notes that if a pregnant woman is attacked and then miscarries, the attacker owes a fine but is not guilty of murder.

In other words, Jewish law protects a fetus as a “potential person,” but does not view it as holding the same full personhood as its mother. Jewish clergy generally agree that abortion is not only permitted, but mandated, to save the life of the mother, because potential life must be sacrificed to save existing life – even during labor, as long as the head has not emerged from the birth canal.

Where Jewish law on abortion gets complicated is when the mother’s life is not at risk. For example, contemporary Jewish leaders debate whether abortion is permitted if the mother’s mental health will be damaged, if genetic testing shows evidence of a nonfatal disability or if there are other compelling concerns, such as that the family’s resources would be strained too much to care for their existing children.

A line of protesters hold signs behind a fence.
Protesters listen during the 2022 Jewish Rally for Abortion Justice in Washington, D.C.
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

American Jews have generally supported legal abortion with very few restrictions, seeing it as a religious freedom issue – and a question of life versus potential life. Eighty-three percent support a woman’s right to an abortion, and while many might turn to their clergy for support in seeking an abortion, many would not see a need to.

A different view of life

As much diversity as exists in Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, there is likely even more in Hinduism, which has a range of texts, deities and worldviews. Many scholars argue that the fact so many different traditions are all lumped together under the umbrella term “Hindusim” has more to do with British colonialism than anything else.

Most Hindus believe in reincarnation, which means that while one may enter bodies with birth and leave with death, life itself does not, precisely, begin or end. Rather, any given moment in a human body is seen as part of an unending cycle of life – making the question of when life begins quite different than in Abrahamic religions.

Some bioethicists see Hinduism as essentially pro-life, permitting abortion only to save the life of the mother. Looking at what people do, though, rather than what a tradition’s sacred texts say, abortion is common in Hindu-majority India, especially of female fetuses.

In the United States, there are immigrant Hindu communities, Asian American Hindu communities, and people who have converted to Hinduism who bring this diversity to their approaches to abortion. Overall, however 68% say abortion should be legal in all or most cases.

Compassionate choices

Buddhists also have varied views on abortion. The Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice notes: “Buddhism, like the other religions of the world, faces the fact that abortion may sometimes be the best decision and a truly moral choice. That does not mean there is nothing troubling about abortion, but it means that Buddhists may understand that reproductive decisions are part of the moral complexity of life.”

A row of small mossy statues of seated figures along a path in the forest.
Jizo statues sit along the Daiya River and Jiunji Temple in Nikko, Japan.
John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images

Japanese Buddhism in particular can be seen as offering a “middle way” between pro-choice and pro-life positions. While many Buddhists see life as beginning at conception, abortion is common and addressed through rituals involving Jizo, one of the enlightened figures Buddhists call bodhisattvas, who is believed to take care of aborted and miscarried fetuses.

In the end, the Buddhist approach to abortion emphasizes that abortion is a complex moral decision that should be made with an eye toward compassion.

We tend to think of the religious response to abortion as one of opposition, but the reality is much more complicated. Formal religious teachings on abortion are complex and divided – and official positions aside, data shows that over and over, the majority of Americans, religious or not, support abortion.

https://theconversation.com/there-is-no-one-religious-view-on-abortion-a-scholar-of-religion-gender-and-sexuality-explains-184532

Love, Victor season 3: Stars open up on pressure to label sexuality

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Love, Victor stars Michael Cimino and George Sear have shared how they feel regarding the pressure actors can feel to disclose their sexuality, emphasising that ‘forcing someone to come out’ is ‘the biggest no-no in the LGBT community’.

This week, season 3 of their heartwarming, joyous show drops on Hulu in the US and Disney Plus in the UK, with the latest episodes following the lead character Victor (Michael) as he navigates a complex love triangle, having come out as gay to his family in the season 1 finale.

Kit Connor, who plays Nick in the widely acclaimed LGBT+ series Heartstopper, recently spoke out about why he doesn’t feel he needs to label his sexuality, after writing on Twitter in response to some fans who speculated on his sexual orientation: ‘Twitter is so funny man. apparently some people on here know my sexuality better than I do…’

While speaking to Metro.co.uk, Michael and George – who plays Victor’s boyfriend Benji on Love, Victor – were asked how they feel about that discussion.

‘I think you just hit the nail on the head there where you said, “It’s up to you, really,”’ said George, who’s 24.

Referencing Kit, who’s 18, the English actor continued: ‘For all we know, he could still be figuring himself out. It’s totally his business, that’s totally up to him, whether to talk about that or not, and I think that’s what it comes down to, is whether people want to or not, really. But you know, it’s part of a big conversation.’

The pair star as Victor and Benji in the Love, Simon spin-off (Picture: Michael Desmond/Hulu)
The actors responded to remarks recently made by Heartstopper star Kit (left) (Picture: Netflix)

Michael, 22, followed on from what his co-star was saying, expressing his belief that ‘there’s a conversation to be had’, while also stressing that ‘people shouldn’t have to be forced to come out’.

‘No one should be forced to come out. It’s like the biggest no-no in the LGBT community is forcing someone to come out, or outing someone else. So just because someone is in the limelight, doesn’t mean that you have to force them to come out and force them to do anything,’ the American actor said.

‘No one owes anybody anything in this industry, and so if someone is still learning how to navigate their sexuality or whatever the case may be, they shouldn’t have to be like, “Yes! This is who I am,” if they’re not sure about it yet.’

He stated that even if people in the spotlight are sure about their sexuality, ‘it’s up to them if they want to announce it to the world’.

‘No one owes anybody anything in this industry,’ Michael said (Picture: Greg Gayne/Hulu)

‘It might just be a thing where it’s like, “Yeah, my family, my friends and the people around me know, and that’s all that matters”,’ he said.

‘It’s not like they’re hiding it, but it’s just like, “I’m an actor, that’s what I’m supposed to do. My personal life doesn’t have to be involved in this,” which is completely understandable.’

George added: ‘I think you should just, as an actor like whatever character you’re playing, you should just really be focused on honouring the character as best you can and doing the best work you can.’

Benji and Victor first form feelings for each other in season one of Love, Victor (Picture: Greg Gayne/Hulu)

During Kit’s interview on the Reign with Josh Smith podcast, the Heartstopper star addressed his tweet, saying: ‘In regards to my tweet, we’re still all so young and to start speculating about our sexualities and maybe pressuring us to come out when maybe we’re not ready.

‘I mean for me, I just feel like I’m perfectly confident and comfortable in my sexuality, but I don’t feel the need to really… I’m not too big on labels and things like that. I’m not massive about that, and I don’t feel like I need to label myself, especially not publicly.’

The actor remarked how he found it ‘funny’ that people still make ‘assumptions’ about other people’s sexualities in 2022.

By season three, the characters are embroiled in a complex love triangle with Rahim (Anthony Keyvan) (Picture: Kelsey McNeal/Hulu)

‘It feels a bit strange to make assumptions about a person’s sexuality just based on hearing their voice or seeing their appearance. I feel like that’s very interesting, [a] slightly problematic assumption to make,’ he said.

In 2020, Love, Victor star Michael explained that he didn’t wish to be placed in a ‘box’ when it came to his sexuality, saying: ‘I don’t want to put myself in a box and put myself in a position where if I were to come out as bi or as gay 10 years from now, that I was defending an identity that was being true to myself.’

Love, Victor season 3 arrives on Wednesday June 15 on Disney Plus and on Hulu in the US.

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If you’ve got a celebrity story, video or pictures get in touch with the Metro.co.uk entertainment team by emailing us [email protected], calling 020 3615 2145 or by visiting our Submit Stuff page – we’d love to hear from you.


MORE : Love, Victor season 3 review: Heartwarming spin-off ends on a high that’ll leave fans wanting more


MORE : Heartstopper season 2 and 3 confirmed after LGBTQ+ teen drama quite literally changes lives

Love, Victor stars Michael Cimino and George Sear open up on pressure to label sexuality: ‘No one should be forced to come out’

A short glossary of some gender and sexuality terms

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Jun. 12—By this point, the acronym LGBT is well-known — lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. But many people may not be familiar with some other terms around gender and sexuality. Here are some definitions, put together using glossaries from Human Rights Campaign, GLAAD, The Trevor Project, Lambda Legal, Asexual Visibility and Education Network, Johns Hopkins Medicine, World Health Organization and NLGJA: The Association of LGBTQ Journalists. Different terms mean different things to different people, so some people may self-identify with a few terms interchangeably while others view them as distinct, and some people may self-identify as a term others may find offensive.

Asexual (adj.) — This term refers to people who don’t experience sexual attraction, which is intrinsic as opposed to the choice of celibacy.

Cisgender (adj.) — A person whose gender identity (see below) matches his or her sex assigned or presumed at birth.

Deadnaming (verb) — Using the name a transgender person used before changing their name, such as the birth name, an action that is widely viewed among transgender people as harmful and disrespectful.

Gender affirming (adj.) — This term describes social, behavioral and medical actions designed to support a transgender person’s gender identity. It typically refers to medical care — such as hormone treatments, surgeries and therapy — and the actions of physicians and practices.

Gender identity (noun) — A person’s concept as male, female, both or neither, which can either match the person’s sex assigned at birth, which is the case for cisgender people, or be different.

Intersex (adj.) — An umbrella term to describe people born with one or more variations in sex characteristics — such as genitalia, reproductive organs or chromosomes — that are different from what is typically considered male or female. This is distinct from being transgender.

LGBTQIA+ — lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual

Nonbinary (adj.) — This term describes people whose gender identity falls outside of exclusively male or female, whether it’s somewhere in between, both or neither. Such people may also or instead identify as genderqueer or agender.

Queer (adj.) — An umbrella term for people who aren’t heterosexual, or an identity for people who find terms like lesbian, gay or bisexual too restrictive. This has historically been a pejorative term that many people have reclaimed in recent years for self-identification, but there are also many non-heterosexual people who don’t want to be called queer.

Pansexual (adj.) — A person who is capable of feeling attraction to people of any gender identity.

Passing — In the context of gender, this refers to when people perceive a transgender person by the person’s gender identity rather than sex assigned at birth. For example, a transgender man passes/is passing if strangers he meets assume he is male by his appearance. However, this term is controversial among transgender people in part because not all transgender people can “pass,” resulting in different levels of privilege, and not all transition with the goal of “passing.” The term can also imply that there’s something deceptive about perceived in line with one’s gender identity.

They/them — Singular pronouns used by nonbinary and genderqueer people, to indicate they don’t want to be referred to as she or he.

Transgender (adj.) — Generally used to describe a person whose gender identity doesn’t match their assigned or presumed sex at birth. Referring to someone as “a transgender” (noun) or “transgendered” is often considered offensive.

https://news.yahoo.com/short-glossary-gender-sexuality-terms-003800152.html

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The Day – A short glossary of some gender and sexuality terms

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By this point, the acronym LGBT is well-known — lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. But many people may not be familiar with some other terms around gender and sexuality. Here are some definitions, put together using glossaries from Human Rights Campaign, GLAAD, The Trevor Project, Lambda Legal, Asexual Visibility and Education Network, Johns Hopkins Medicine, World Health Organization and NLGJA: The Association of LGBTQ Journalists. Different terms mean different things to different people, so some people may self-identify with a few terms interchangeably while others view them as distinct, and some people may self-identify as a term others may find offensive.

Asexual (adj.) — This term refers to people who don’t experience sexual attraction, which is intrinsic as opposed to the choice of celibacy.

Cisgender (adj.) — A person whose gender identity (see below) matches his or her sex assigned or presumed at birth.

Deadnaming (verb) — Using the name a transgender person used before changing their name, such as the birth name, an action that is widely viewed among transgender people as harmful and disrespectful.

Gender affirming (adj.) — This term describes social, behavioral and medical actions designed to support a transgender person’s gender identity. It typically refers to medical care — such as hormone treatments, surgeries and therapy — and the actions of physicians and practices.

Gender identity (noun) — A person’s concept as male, female, both or neither, which can either match the person’s sex assigned at birth, which is the case for cisgender people, or be different.

Intersex (adj.) — An umbrella term to describe people born with one or more variations in sex characteristics — such as genitalia, reproductive organs or chromosomes — that are different from what is typically considered male or female. This is distinct from being transgender.

LGBTQIA+ — lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual

Nonbinary (adj.) — This term describes people whose gender identity falls outside of exclusively male or female, whether it’s somewhere in between, both or neither. Such people may also or instead identify as genderqueer or agender.

Queer (adj.) — An umbrella term for people who aren’t heterosexual, or an identity for people who find terms like lesbian, gay or bisexual too restrictive. This has historically been a pejorative term that many people have reclaimed in recent years for self-identification, but there are also many non-heterosexual people who don’t want to be called queer.

Pansexual (adj.) — A person who is capable of feeling attraction to people of any gender identity.

Passing — In the context of gender, this refers to when people perceive a transgender person by the person’s gender identity rather than sex assigned at birth. For example, a transgender man passes/is passing if strangers he meets assume he is male by his appearance. However, this term is controversial among transgender people in part because not all transgender people can “pass,” resulting in different levels of privilege, and not all transition with the goal of “passing.” The term can also imply that there’s something deceptive about perceived in line with one’s gender identity.

They/them — Singular pronouns used by nonbinary and genderqueer people, to indicate they don’t want to be referred to as she or he.

Transgender (adj.) — Generally used to describe a person whose gender identity doesn’t match their assigned or presumed sex at birth. Referring to someone as “a transgender” (noun) or “transgendered” is often considered offensive.


https://www.theday.com/local-news/20220612/short-glossary-of-some-gender-and-sexuality-terms

Categories: Reviews

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